Frequently Asked Questions

What resources does the NWHM offer? 

On our website you can find a lot of wonderful resources and tools including: teacher resources, resources for National History Day, resources related to the Woman’s Suffrage Movement, virtual exhibits on various women and topics in women’s history, public programming, articles highlighting women and their contributions to U.S. history, biographies of important women (including our monthly Fab Five), and voter registration information. 

 

How do I find resources related to women’s suffrage?  

Please see our research resources page for a list of suggested places to start. 

 

How do I find resources related to the women’s rights movement?  

Please see our research resources page for a list of suggested places to start. Our website also features virtual exhibits on many aspects of the women’s rights movement, including the woman’s suffrage movement, women’s political culture and participation, and, debuting throughout 2021, the four waves of feminism!  

 

Where can I find other online resources related to women’s history? 

Please see our research resources page for a list of suggested places to start. 

 

How do I make an appointment to view materials from the NWHM study collection? 

The NWHM Study Collection is open between 9:00 am – 5:00 pm, Tuesday through Thursday. Please make an appointment to visit by emailing info[email protected]. See The Study Collection page for more information.  

 

How can I get help with my History Day project?  

Please see our National History Day page for a list of resources and suggestions. 

     

What is the difference between a “suffragist” and a “suffragette?” 

Simply, a “suffragette” refers to those involved in the British movement for a woman’s right to vote. A “suffragist” refers to those involved in the U.S. movement for a woman’s right to vote. The word “suffragette” was also sometimes used to mark someone as a more radical supporter of a woman’s right to vote and could be seen as a positive (if self-identified) or a negative (if someone used it as a critique of chosen strategy, language, etc.) For more see the following links:
https://www.nps.gov/articles/suffragistvssuffragette.htm  

 

What is the difference between a primary and a secondary source? 

Simply explained, Primary Sources are original documents or objects that were created at the time of your study. These can be diaries, government documents, books, photographs, films, newspapers, maps, etc. Secondary Sources are documents written about a topic or time period. They will retell, analyze, or interpret events and primary sources. These can be text books, documentaries, scholarly writing, etc.

For more information, or for lessons plans for teaching the difference, visit here.