Determined to Rise

Women’s Historical Activism for Equal Rights
Determined to Rise

As the centenary of woman suffrage approaches, the National Women’s History Museum presents a commemorative initiative, “Determined to Rise:” Women’s Historical Activism for Equal Rights. This series of public programming features scholarly panels, public events, and lively discussions on women’s history topics from the early 1830s when African-American women abolitionist groups organized to fight for freedom, personhood, and women’s rights to the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920.

“Determined to Rise” shapes a broader understanding of the woman suffrage movement throughout the turn of the century, acknowledging not only the achievements resulting in the ratification of the 19th Amendment, but also its profound limitations.

Please join us for a discussion at an upcoming event near you.

The “Determined to Rise”: Women’s Historic Activism for Equal Rights traveling panel series is generously funded by Ms. Jeannette Sharpe.


 

 

June 23, 2020 (Reimagined as a virtual conference due to COVID-19) : National Coalition of Girls’ Schools  Annual Conference

Topic: Correcting the Archive: Historical Empathy and Inclusivity in the Social Studies Classroom Through the Lens of Woman Suffrage (online event)

Co-Hosts:

TBD

  • Holly Hotchner is the President and CEO of the National Women’s History Museum. She has extensive experience creating institutional advancement, as well as new and interesting experiences for museum visitors. Prior to coming to the National Women’s History Museum, Hotchner led her own consulting firm working with nonprofits on strategic growth and held positions with The Princess Grace Foundation, Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Tate Gallery, and the Museum of Modern Art. She holds an MA in Art History from The Institute of Fine Arts, a BA in Art History and Studio Art from Trinity College, completed Harvard University Business School’s Non-Profit Education Program, and attended the Museum Management Institute.

Panelists:

  • Dr. Kenvi Philips is the first Curator for Race and Ethnicity at the Schlesinger Library of the Harvard Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. An accomplished historian, Phillips holds a master’s in public history and a doctorate in US history from Howard University. Before coming to the Schlesinger, she worked at the Mary McLeod Bethune House in Washington and the Maryland–National Capital Park and Planning Commission. Most recently, she served as assistant curator for manuscripts and librarian for prints and photographs at Howard’s internationally renowned Moorland-Spingarn Research Center.
  • Dr. Martha S. Jones is the Society of Black Alumni Presidential Professor and Professor of History at The Johns Hopkins University. She is the author of Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America (Cambridge University Press, 2018) and, forthcoming in 2020, Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Fought for Rights for All.
  • Dr. Katherine Perrotta is an Assistant Professor of Middle Grades and Secondary Education with an emphasis on social studies education in the Mercer University College of Education.  She was the recipient of the John Laska Distinguished Dissertation Award in 2017 from the American Association of Teaching and Curriculum for her research on implementing historical empathy pedagogies in middle and secondary social studies. Her research on historical empathy pedagogies, high impact practices, student engagement, social studies methods, and the history of education topics on antebellum civil rights activist Elizabeth Jennings have been published in several leading educational and history journals.
  • Dr. Allison K. Lange is an associate professor of history at the Wentworth Institute of Technology. She received her PhD in history from Brandeis University. Lange’s book, Picturing Political Power: Images in the Women’s Suffrage Movement, was published in May 2020 by the University of Chicago Press. The book focuses on the ways that women’s rights activists and their opponents used images to define gender and power during the suffrage movement.

 

August 20, 2020 : Michigan History Center in collaboration with Michigan Women Forward (Lansing, MI)

Topic: Woman Suffrage: The West Came First

Moderator:

  • Valerie Marvin is an historian and curator at the Michigan State Capitol in Lansing, a National Historic Landmark. In this capacity, she oversees the Capitol’s historical collections, and conducts extensive research on Capitol and legislative history, sharing her findings through publications, lectures, and social media. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan (Bachelor of Arts in Russian Studies, 2005) and Eastern Michigan University (Masters of Science in Historic Preservation, 2009). Marvin is an active member of the Historical Society of Greater Lansing, the Downtown Lansing Inc. Design Committee, and the Lansing Woman’s Club.

Panelists:

  • Dr. Lori Ann Lahlum is a professor in the department of history at Minnesota State University in Mankato where she teaches courses on the American West, Minnesota history, and western women’s and gender history. She and Molly Rozum edited Equality at the Ballot Box: Votes for Women on the Northern Great Plains, which came out with South Dakota Historical Press in 2019. Lahlum also publishes on Norwegian America.
  • Dr. Virginia Caruso is an historian and member of the board of trustees at the Historical Society of Michigan in Plainwell. She retired in 2001 after 34 years of teaching history at 4-year liberal arts colleges, and community colleges. She holds graduate degrees from the University of Michigan where she received her MA, has a specialist in the arts degree from Western Michigan University, and her PhD from Michigan State University. Her interest in both Michigan and women’s history date back to early 1981 when she discovered that the standard texts on Michigan history were inconsistent about when women in Michigan achieved equal suffrage. Focusing on this topic for her dissertation, her research focuses on woman suffrage, voting rights, voting in Michigan, and the political activism of women. She currently serves on the board of the Historical Society of Michigan, serves as a Michigan History Day judge, and is active with the local Friends of Michigan Library Group.
  • Dr. Molly Rozum is an associate professor and the director of graduate studies at The University of South Dakota in Vermillion. She is the co-editor (with Lori Ann Lahlum) of Equality at the Ballot Box: Votes for Women on the Northern Great Plains, published by South Dakota Historical Society Press (2019). The volume includes her article, “Citizenship, Civilization, and Property: The 1890 South Dakota Vote on Woman Suffrage and Indian Suffrages.” Rozum is Associate Professor and Ronald R. Nelson Chair of Great Plains and South Dakota History at The University of South Dakota, Vermillion and teaches the histories of South Dakota, and the Great Plains, and the American West, and Modern Women’s History. Rozum grew up in Mitchell, South Dakota.

 

August 27, 2020 : Newberry Library (Chicago, IL)

Topic: Chicago’s African American Women in the Fight for the Vote

Moderator:

  • Dr. Liesel Olson is the director of Chicago Studies at the Newberry Library. She received her doctorate degree in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University in New York and taught at the University of Chicago as a Harper-Schmidt Fellow for four years. Olson has written widely on twentieth-century literature and art, including her first book Modernism and the Ordinary (Oxford University Press, 2009) and her most recent book Chicago Renaissance: Literature and Art in the Midwest Metropolis  (Yale, 2017), which won the 2018 Pegasus Award from the Poetry Foundation for the best book of poetry criticism and the 2019 Mid-America Award from the Society for the Study of Midwestern Literature.

Panelists:

  • Dr. Wanda Hendricks is a distinguished professor emerita of history in the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of South Carolina where she teaches undergraduate and graduate courses on African Americans, African American women and the United States from 1865 to the present. Her most recent publication is Fannie Barrier Williams: Crossing The Borders of Region and Race (University of Illinois Press, 2014) which was awarded the Letitia Woods Brown prize by the Association of Black Women Historians for the best book by a senior scholar in African American Women’s History. Hendricks is also the author of Gender, Race, and Politics: Black Club Women in Illinois (Indiana University Press, 1998) and a senior editor of the three volume Black Women in America: Second Edition (Oxford University Press, 2005). Her essay ”On the Margins: Creating a Space and Place in the Academy” was published in Spring 2008 in Telling Histories: Black Women Historians in the Ivory Tower (University of North Carolina Press).
  • Dr. Kenvi Philips is the first Curator for Race and Ethnicity at the Schlesinger Library of the Harvard Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. An accomplished historian, Phillips holds a master’s in public history and a doctorate in US history from Howard University. Before coming to the Schlesinger, she worked at the Mary McLeod Bethune House in Washington and the Maryland–National Capital Park and Planning Commission. Most recently, she served as assistant curator for manuscripts and librarian for prints and photographs at Howard’s internationally renowned Moorland-Spingarn Research Center.
  • Dr. Tikia K. Hamilton holds a PhD in history from Princeton, where she also taught. She holds a masters in African-American studies from Columbia and a B.A. in history from Dartmouth. She is a National Academy of Education Spencer Fellowship recipient and teaches at the Latin School of Chicago. Hamilton has extensive experience working in the areas of diversity, equity, and inclusion, stemming back to her service work at Dartmouth and Columbia. At Princeton, she served as a diversity fellow in the Office of Academic Affairs and Diversity. She has taught history at Sidwell Friends in D.C., and Fieldston School in New York, where she founded the school's first black affinity group and led various workshops to diversify curriculum and expand awareness on issues of race and gender. She currently is working on a book that examines race, education, and politics in the nation's capital during the decades surrounding Brown, has conducted extensive research in women's history and activism, and holds a Certificate in Gender and Sexuality Studies from Princeton.
     

 

October 8, 2020 : National Czech and Slovak Museum & Library (Cedar Rapids, IA)

Topic: The Influence of Immigration and Citizenship Rights on the Woman Suffrage Movement

*Planning in progress.