Electronic Field Trips

Due to overwhelming interest and demand for our electronic field trips, we are unfortunately no longer able to schedule any additional field trips at this time.

Beginning Monday, April 6th, and over the next few months, we'll be providing a fresh new virtual resource everyday, Monday through Friday. From live-broadcast field trips to virtual workshops, our new Brave Girls Virtual Story Time to the return of our popular Women's History Minute videos, we invite you to take a "women's history break" each day with us. All audiences are welcome. Your daily inspiration can be found at https://www.womenshistory.org/nwhmathome

Current Electronic Field Trips:

Standing Up for Change: African American Women and the Civil Rights Movement

In the 20th century, African American women formed the backbone of the modern Civil Rights Movement. They were the critical mass, the grassroots leaders challenging America to embrace justice and equality for all. This program discusses women’s critical roles in the Montgomery Bus Boycott, Little Rock’s Central High School integration, and the little-known women behind the scenes of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Join us to explore the Civil Rights Movement through the perspectives of its women leaders.

 

Taking a Stand Part 1: The Beginnings of Woman Suffrage (1776-1872)

Though the woman suffrage movement started in 1848, the movement had roots going back to the beginning of the country. This program will explore the early factors in the suffrage movement including key women such as Abigail Adams, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Sojourner Truth, and Susan B. Anthony. Learn about the beginnings of the women's rights movement in the United States and the legislation that was put in place to halt the movement. 

 

Taking a Stand Part 2: Woman Suffrage and Protest at the White House (1872-1920)

By the early 20th century women had yet to achieve the vote nationally. A group of women, adopting radical tactics from their British counterparts, brought their protests to Washington, DC and the White House fence. Learn how Alice Paul, Lucy Burns, and the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA) drew public attention to their cause and became a model for peaceful public protest marches in the United States.

 

Previous Electronic Field Trips (videos are currently free for use):

Women Pioneers of Computer Programming

In 1943 the US Army hired six women mathematicians to set up and operate the Army’s newest top secret weapon in World War II. The Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer (ENIAC) was the first electronic, digital computer. These unsung heroes figured out how to wire the electrical connections that enabled ENIAC to complete 300 multiplications per second. This field trip incorporates math and science content including electronic circuits and geometry. To see a recording of this program, click here.

 

Katherine Johnson and the Mathematics of the Space Race

Getting astronauts to space and back involves more than rockets and hardware. During America’s space race in the 1950s and 60s, mathematicians performed calculations that determined the geometry for space orbit. Women “computers”, including National Women’s History Museum’s Women Making History honoree Katherine Johnson, were integral members of NASA’s teams. Join us to learn the mathematical concepts behind space orbit and the women who sent America’s astronauts into space. To see a recording of this program, click here.